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Monday, 25 May 2015

British Muslims Face Worst Job Discrimination of Any Minority Group.

Muslim women are up to 65 per cent less likely to be employed than white Christian counterparts.
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Muslims are facing the worst job discrimination of any minority group in Britain, according to new research which found that they had the lowest chance of being in work or in a managerial role.

Muslim men were up to 76 per cent less likely to have a job of any kind compared to white, male British Christians of the same age and with the same qualifications. And Muslim women were up to 65 per cent less likely to be employed than white Christian counterparts.
Muslims were the most disadvantaged in terms of employment prospects out of 14 ethno-religious groupings in the UK, researchers Dr Nabil Khattab and Professor Ron Johnston found using data from the Office for National Statistics' Labour Force Survey of more than half a million people. Skin colour made little difference to the figures.

Dr Nabil Khattab, of Bristol University, said the situation was "likely to stem from placing Muslims collectively at the lowest stratum within the country's racial or ethno-cultural system due to growing Islamophobia and hostility against them.

They are perceived as disloyal and as a threat rather than just as a disadvantaged minority," he added. "Within this climate, many employers will be discouraged from employing qualified Muslims, especially if there are others from their own groups or others from less threatening groups who can fill these jobs."

Dr Khattab said the "penalties" for being Muslim got worse when applying for better-paid managerial or professional jobs.
"If this persists, it could have long-term implications for the cohesion of the UK's multi-ethnic, multicultural society. The exclusion of well-qualified black and Muslim individuals could undermine their willingness to integrate in the wider society," he said.

For women, Muslim Pakistanis and a "Muslim other" group were 65 per cent less likely to have a job, with Muslim Indians 55 per cent, Muslim Bangladeshis 51 per cent and white Muslims 43 per cent less likely. For men, the "Muslim other" group was 76 per cent less likely to be in work, followed by Muslim Bangladeshis (66 per cent), white Muslims (64 per cent), Muslim Pakistanis (59 per cent) and Muslim Indians (37 per cent), the Social Science Journal study found.

White British men and women of no religion were, respectively, 20 and 25 per cent less likely to have a job than Christians. Black Christians with Caribbean origins were 54 per cent and 48 per cent less likely.

The only ethno-religious group with better work prospects than white British Christians were British Jews, with women and men 29 and 15 per cent more likely to be employed.
Of those in work, the researchers found only 23 per cent and 27 per cent of Muslim Bangladeshis and Muslim Pakistanis, respectively, had a salaried job. White British Jews had the highest rates, with 64 per cent in salaried jobs, followed by Hindu Indians and white Christian Irish on 53 and 51 per cent respectively. White British Christians, white British of no religion and black Christian Africans were all above 40 per cent.

Dr Khattab added: "The main components of this discrimination are skin colour and culture or religion. But colour is dynamic, which means white colour can be valued in one case, but devalued when associated with Muslims. Equally, having a dark skin colour – Hindu Indians, for example – is not always associated with any significant penalty."

Masturbating men ‘will find their hands pregnant in the afterlife,’ says Muslim televangelist.


After claiming that a man would makt his masturbating hand “pregnant in the afterlife” and “asking for its rights,” a Muslim televangelist has set Turkish social media aflame.

Self-styled televangelist Mücahid Cihad Han dived into some delicate matters on May 24 when he answered his viewers’ questions on private television station 2000 TV, Turkish media has reported. Han initially looked puzzled when a viewer said he “kept masturbating, although he was married, and even during the Umrah,” a pilgrimage to Mecca performed by Muslims which can be undertaken at any time of the year, in contrast to the Hajj.

After repeating the question a few times, Han claimed that Islam strictly prohibits masturbation as a “haram” (forbidden) act. “Moreover, one hadith states that those who have sexual intercourse with their hands will find their hands pregnant in the afterlife, complaining against them to God over its rights,” he said, referring to what he claimed to be a saying of Prophet Muhammad.

“If our viewer was single, I could recommend he marry, but what can I say now?” the televangelist added, advising the viewer to “resist Satan’s temptations.”

Is masturbation forbidden in Islam?

“Istimna,” the Arabic term for masturbation that Han also referred to, is a controversial issue in Islam, as there have been varying opinions on its permissibility throughout history. The Quran has no clear reference to masturbation and the authenticity of many hadiths is questionable.

Despite Han’s assertive religious stance, only a limited number of Islamic interpretations categorize masturbation as “haram,” while most of others call it a “makruh” (disliked) act. Many of the mainstream Islamic interpretations even allow it in certain conditions, like if the act could be used to avoid the temptation of an extramarital affair. 

Han, who has more than 12,000 followers on Twitter, was mocked on Turkish social media on May 25, after newspapers published his latest television “fatwa.” 

“Are there any hand-gynaecologists in the afterlife? Is abortion allowed there?” one Twitter user asked, while mentioning Han’s Twitter user name.

“So you think that being pregnant is a God-given punishment?” another user asked.


Hang on a minuet while i just change my pant's,because i've just pissed myself laughing LOL.

We all know Muslims are stupid thick mental idiots, with all the utter rubbish they believe, but this one is a cracker, i mean they have to have no sense at all, to follow a dead paedophile who believes in child sex, sex with animals and the murder of innocent people.

So yes, i would say Islam is for the totally insane. Then of course, there are the 72 virgins waiting in the after life for all the Muslims who died while killing their enemy and for those that were blown up by a bomb going off, you can hear the virgins saying, well a pair of balls has arrived, but where's the rest of him, lol.

Muslims believe there are just 72 virgins, not 72 virgins per man, but 72 virgins period. What the Muslims believe is,every time a Muslim man in the afterlife has intercourse with one of the 72 virgins, as soon has he has had sex with her, she then becomes a virgin all over again, ready for the next brain dead idiot. I would say that is a punishment and not a pleasure for both of them, don't you think.

And now the classic of all tales, the story of the pregnant hand in the afterlife, you can't make this up can you, if you masturbait during your life on earth, you hand will become pregnant in the after life. How can anyone take Islam as a stable religion, they are insane,anyone who is a Muslim and believes this crap should be locked up fora very long time.

What a pathetic bunch of murdering paedophils Muslims are.

The class where EVERY pupil speaks English as a second language: Birmingham primary has form of 29 Year 6 students who speak nine different foreign dialects

This is the Year 6 class at a Birmingham primary school where English is a second language for every single pupil.

Between them, the 29 children in the form at Greet Primary School in Sparkhill, Birmingham, speak nine different languages and dialects, including Urdu, Pashto, Hindko - a dialect of Western Punjabi - and Arabic, as well as English and Spanish.

But despite the challenge of 94.3 per cent of the school's 859 pupils speaking an additional tongue, and being in an area last year plagued by the 'Trojan Horse' extremism plot, the primary is rated 'outstanding' by Ofsted and has a waiting list in every year group.
A class above: Each of the 29 pupils in this Year 6 class at Greet Primary School in Sparkhill, Birmingham, speak English as a second language, with nine languages or dialects spoken by the children
A class above: Each of the 29 pupils in this Year 6 class at Greet Primary School in Sparkhill, Birmingham, speak English as a second language, with nine languages or dialects spoken by the children.

Some 23 different languages are spoken across the school, including Romanian, Japanese, French, Italian, Polish, Dutch, Somali, Gujurati, Hindi, Tamil and Sinhalese, from Sri Lanka. All children at the school start Spanish lessons in Year 3.

Most of the pupils speaking only limited English, if any, when they start. Many of the children at the school have their family roots in Pakistan.

Headteacher Emma Tyler said: 'While the majority of our pupils arrive with little to no English, it's our mission to seek achievement for all.
'We're a school for the community and so everyone, staff, pupils and parents, works really hard to make the school what it is.'
Making the grade: Year 6 teacher Nasreen Begum is also a specialist in teaching English as an additional language to help ensure her pupils are fluent by the time they depart for secondary school
Making the grade: Year 6 teacher Nasreen Begum is also a specialist in teaching English as an additional language to help ensure her pupils are fluent by the time they depart for secondary school
Ahran Ali speaks Urdu
Shaila Bibi speaks Hindko, a dialect of Western Punjabi
Pupils: Ahran Ali (left) speaks Urdu, Shaila Bibi (centre) speaks Hindko, a dialect of Western Punjabi and Farhan Mohammed speaks Arabic
Amar Imran speaks Urdu
Marwan Hassan speaks Arabic
Learning languages: Year 6 pupil Marwan Hassan (left) speaks Arabic and his classmate Farhan Mohammed (centre) speaks both Arabic and Urdu, while Aksa Shaheen (right) also speaks Hindko.

Three years ago, Ofsted singled out Greet as a 'good practice' example of schools doing well to teach pupils who do not speak English as their first language.
It takes 161 staff and 35 volunteers to help the children make the 'outstanding progress' from no spoken English and limited skills in other areas to reach 'broadly average standards' identified by Ofsted.

Linguist: Pupil, Saira Bibi, 11, speaks Urdu, Pashto, Hindko and Arabic as well as immaculate English and is proud to now be learning Spanish with her classmates
Linguist: Pupil, Saira Bibi, 11, speaks Urdu, Pashto, Hindko and Arabic as well as immaculate English and is proud to now be learning Spanish with her classmates
The team is led by two heads of school: Mrs Tyler and Sheenagh Edger who between them have 51 years of teaching experience and have spent 34 years at Greet.

There is also an executive headteacher, Pat Smart who oversees not just Greet but Conway Primary - a school previously in special measures that has improved to good since Greet took it under its wing.

And while many schools have an English as an additional language (EAL) team, every teacher at the school is trained in the specialism, helping to ensure that by the time the 90 Year 6 pupils leave for secondary schools this summer, most of them cab speak the language fluently.

Mrs Edger said the school's language provision starts long before autumn term begins in September.

'Every child is invited to the school for a play session before they start and we do a home visit for every new starter,' she said.

'And many of our teaching assistants and teachers themselves speak the community languages their pupils arrive with to help the transition.'

All staff emphasise visual aids and repetition to help children associate words with their meaning and have to employ the highest standards of grammar and clarity in their own language.

And when children join the school mid-way through the academic year they are often assigned a 'buddy' - a classmate who can help integrate them into friendship groups as well as the new language.
Year 6 teacher Nasreen Begum says that although the challenges of teaching EAL pupils has changed by the last year of school, she still uses many of the same techniques as in lower down the school.

'By the time they reach me in year six most have achieved fluency and are secure in English,' she said.
'The next step is to introduce them to kind of language that will be used in the SATs - the kind of vocabulary they might not come across at home.
'So that's lots of visual aids, using thesauruses and repetition.'
She is helped by the school's decision to spend funding from the pupil premium on a higher staff to pupil ratio which can be as low as 1:10.

Pupil, Saira Bibi, 11, speaks Urdu, Pashto, Hindko and Arabic as well as immaculate English and is proud to now be learning Spanish with her classmates. 
'Sometimes I get confused with all the languages going round in my head but I like it that I can speak to lots of different people,' she said.

'If there's someone that doesn't speak English very well I can help them and communicate with them.
'And I love this school - it's really fun.'
Although they will sometimes host breakout groups to teach 'survival English' to new arrivals at the school, but Mrs Tyler and Mrs Edger believe inclusiveness is key and that the EAL provision should be a whole school approach which is not served by separating the fluent from the less confidant.

The school, which will sometimes hire translators to help communicate with the children's families, also has a senior parent support advisor, Shamim Din, who is a confidante for parents as much as a link home-school link and speaks Mirpuri, Punjabi, Urdu, Hindi and Gurmukhi Punjabi.
Abubakr Mohammed speaks Pashtu and Hindko
Yusrah Butt speaks Mirpuri
School ties: Abubakr Mohammed (left) speaks Pashtu and Hindko, and Yusrah Butt (centre) speaks Mirpuri - an Indo-Aryan Lahnda language related to Hindko, while Mohammed Ismail Tahir (right) speaks Punjabi
Rina Rashid speaks Mirpuri
Alishma Begum speaks Bengali
Schoolgirls: Rina Rashid (left) speaks Mirpuri and Alishma Begum (centre) speaks Bengali, while Amina Uddin (right) speaks Pashtu
M.Sams Uddin speaks Bengali
Duaa Ahmed speaks Mirpuri
Year 6: Sams Uddin (left) speaks Bengali and his classmate Duaa Ahmed (right) speaks Mirpuri.

AROUND THE WORLD IN THE CLASSROOM: THE NINE LANGUAGES SPOKEN BY THE YEAR 6 CLASS 

Bengali
Hindko
Mirpuri
Urdu
Pashto
Punjabi
Arabic
English
Spanish 
Greet's last Ofsted report, compiled in 2007, described the primary as an 'outstanding school that successfully combines outstanding achievement, extremely high standards of care and lots of fun.'

It's not just inspectors who are impressed - parents flock to get their children a place at the school, and say the teaching on offer has helped the entire family. 

Elina Ali's two children speak her native Romanian, her husband's native Urdu, and Japanese - the couple's other common tongue. 
Having now learnt English from her children, she volunteers at the school part-time.

 'Greet has been amazing for my children,' she said. When my daughter first arrived she didn't speak any English but after five months she understood almost everything.'
And it isn't just parents who know their children will benefit from the EAL provision that are desperate to get their children a place.

Healthcare assistant Sassie Hall, 27, only speaks English at home with her four children.
When her eldest daughter didn't get originally get a place, she appealed and fought to make sure she could attend Greet.
Her two other daughters have followed and her son is due to start at the nursery in September.
But despite now living eight miles from the school gates she says the journey is worth it every day. 
Mothers: Sassie Hall, who fought to get her child a place at the school, with fellow parents Farhio Mohamud, Shaheen Alam, Rukhsana Bi, and Elina Ali - whose two children speak her native Romanian, her husband's native Urdu, and Japanese
Mothers: Sassie Hall, who fought to get her child a place at the school, with fellow parents Farhio Mohamud, Shaheen Alam, Rukhsana Bi, and Elina Ali - whose two children speak her native Romanian, her husband's native Urdu, and Japanese



Are you disgusted yet, if not then you bloody well should be, because this is the future your looking at with not one English person in sight.

Brainwashed Muslim children aged five think Christmas is banned, warns Scotland Yard commander.

Muslim children as young as five have become so indoctrinated by Islamist propaganda they believe Christmas is sinful, Britain’s most senior Muslim police officer warned yesterday.
Scotland Yard commander Mak Chishty said children had voiced opposition to marking the festive holiday – branding it ‘haram’, which means forbidden by their god Allah.
He said that parents need to address ‘all the ugly bit of the problem’, and ask how children had come to that view.
Mr Chishty also warned of a need for parents to spot early signs of radicalisation, which could include their sons and daughters refusing to shop in certain places, such as Marks & Spencer.
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Scotland Yard commander Mak Chishty said children had voiced opposition to marking Christmas – branding it ‘haram’, which means forbidden by their god Allah
Scotland Yard commander Mak Chishty said children had voiced opposition to marking Christmas – branding it ‘haram’, which means forbidden by their god Allah
Bethnal Green schoolgirls Shamima Begum, Amira Abase and Kadiza Sultana - three of around 700 British Muslims thought to have been lured to Syria by IS propaganda
Bethnal Green schoolgirls Shamima Begum, Amira Abase and Kadiza Sultana - three of around 700 British Muslims thought to have been lured to Syria by IS propaganda.

The store is mistakenly perceived to be Jewish-owned and in the past, Lord Sieff, the founder of M&S, reportedly made several statements in support of Israel’s military policies in relation to the Arab state of Palestine.
Mr Chishty said that Islamist propaganda should be countered with intensified monitoring to detect the earliest signs of anti-Western sentiment.

Refusing to shop at Marks & Spencer could be an early sign of radicalisation, according to Mr Chishty
Refusing to shop at Marks & Spencer could be an early sign of radicalisation, according to Mr Chishty
These could include sudden negative attitudes towards alcohol, social occasions and Western clothing. 
He said there was now a need for ‘a move into the private space’ of Muslims to spot views that could show the beginning of radicalisation far earlier. 
‘We need to now be less precious about the private space,’ he said. 

‘This is not about us invading private thoughts, but acknowledging that it is in these private spaces where this [extremism] first germinates.
‘The purpose of private space intervention is to engage, explore, explain, educate or eradicate. Hate and extremism are not acceptable in our society, and if people cannot be educated, then hate and harmful extremism must be eradicated through all lawful means.

Asked to define ‘private space’, Mr Chishty said: ‘It is anything from walking down the road, looking at a mobile, to someone in a bedroom surfing the net, to someone in a shisha cafe talking about things.’
He said what is new about Islamic State is the use of social media to spread its message and urge those of the same extreme views to join the terror group or stage attacks in their home country.

And in a stark warning, he said there was no end in sight to the number of British Muslims, around 700 so far, being lured to Syria by IS propaganda.

The comments come after a Daily Mail investigation revealed how easy it was for British schoolgirls to be enticed into fleeing to Iraq and Syria to become ‘jihadi brides’.

An IS plot to lure a 16-year-old to Syria to marry a jihadist was foiled after the Mail passed on evidence that she was planning to run away to counter-terror officers.
Possibilities: Salma (pictured) and Zahra Halane, of Greater Manchester, are among the other teenagers known to have gone to Syria to become jihadi brides
Zahra and her sister could also be the girls on the run
Twin schoolgirls Salma (left) and Zahra Halane (right), of Greater Manchester, were lured to Iraq by ISIS



They swooped on the girl’s home after it emerged she was being lured by her older sister, a prolific IS recruiter who fled London last year to be a jihadi bride. 
The plot had been laid out in extraordinary detail in secret online messages, with timings and prices planned for every train, flight and hotel she was set to stay at on the way.

Mr Chishty, head of community engagement for the Metropolitan Police in London, said IS propaganda is so powerful that he has to be vigilant about his own children.
Directing his comments at other Muslim parents, he told the Guardian: ‘I am not immunised. If I feel the need to be extra vigilant, then I think you need to feel the need to be extra vigilant.’

Mr Chishty said friends and family of youngsters at risk of extremism should be intervening much earlier, watching out for subtle, unexplained changes, because those closest to them are best placed to do so. 
He said they should challenge and understand what caused such changes in behaviour and seek help, if needs be from the police, if they are worried.
Mr Chishty said it did not make someone an extremist if they criticised ‘British values’, but friends and family should ask why.

He added that more work is needed to understand why young people are attracted to IS: ‘Some are bored, overqualified, underemployed… It is not a holy war.’

BRITISH SUICIDE BOMBER FATLAM SHALAKU WENT TO 'SOCIALIST ETON'

A British suicide bomber who helped jihadis take the Iraqi city of Ramadi was from a top London state school nicknamed the ‘socialist Eton’.
Ramadi was the first major city seized by insurgents in Iraq since paramilitary groups began pushing them back last year. 
Over the weekend it emerged that former Holland Park School pupil Fatlum Shalaku was among six ‘martyrs’ who blew themselves up as IS surged into the town 60 miles west of Baghdad.
Fatlum Shalaku was among six ‘martyrs’ who blew themselves up as IS surged into the town of Ramadi
Fatlum Shalaku was among six ‘martyrs’ who blew themselves up as IS surged into the town of Ramadi.

The 20-year-old was following in the footsteps of his brother, Flamur, 23, who is believed to have died on the battlefield in Iraq in March. 
Flamur is thought to have been studying at Greenwich University, the same place as Michael Adebolajo, one of the killers of Fusilier Lee Rigby.

Both brothers came from a non-devout Muslim family of Kosovan-Albanian descent and lived on the top floor of a 20-storey council tower block in Ladbroke Grove, west London. 
Yesterday a neighbour said their parents has been ‘very upset’ by their sons’ increasingly hard-line beliefs.
At least three other former pupils at Holland Park School in Kensington and Chelsea (pictured) have also been killed in Syria and Iraq
At least three other former pupils at Holland Park School in Kensington and Chelsea (pictured) have also been killed in Syria and Iraq.

According to one of his school friends, Fatlum was ‘friendly’ and liked to post pictures of his ‘honed physique’ on social media. 
They added: ‘Fatlum was competitive when it came to exercise and posting pictures on Facebook. He was very popular – always surrounded by a large group of friends.’

Another said: ‘We have to ask why a person full of talent, dreams, possibility and potential would blow themselves up?’
At least three other former pupils from Holland Park School in Kensington and Chelsea – where a number of high-profile socialists have sent their children – have also been killed in Syria and Iraq. 
One sixth-former is still fighting on the front line with IS, while another has been jailed for funding jihad, according to The Sunday Times.
 
IS: We have enough cash to buy a nuke
Islamic State jihadis claim to have enough money to buy a nuclear weapon within a year.
The terror group claimed it had billions of pounds, enough to make their growing arsenal of ‘tanks, rocket launchers and missile systems’ even deadlier.
An article in terrorist magazine Dabiq claimed corrupt Pakistani officials would be willing to sell the nuclear weapon to them.
Entitled The Perfect Storm, it was supposedly written by British hostage John Cantlie. It read: ‘Let me throw a hypothetical operation on to the table.
British hostage John Cantlie supposedly wrote The Perfect Storm, claiming corrupt Pakistani officials would be willing to sell a nuclear weapon to ISIS
British hostage John Cantlie supposedly wrote The Perfect Storm, claiming corrupt Pakistani officials would be willing to sell a nuclear weapon to ISIS
ISIS raised their flag over a citadel in the ancient ruins of Palmyra, having reportedly killed 400 civilians in the town istelf
ISIS raised their flag over a citadel in the ancient ruins of Palmyra, having reportedly killed 400 civilians in the town istelf.

‘The Islamic State has billions of dollars in the bank, so they call on their wilayah in Pakistan to purchase a nuclear device through weapons dealers with links to corrupt officials in the region.’
Photojournalist Mr Cantlie has been held hostage by IS for more than two years.
He has regularly been used in propaganda videos – including presenting the YouTube series Lend Me Your Ears.
His latest message came as IS slaughtered hundreds of women, children and elderly civilians in Palmyra, leaving their bodies strewn across the streets of the ancient Syrian city.

As they carried out their latest sickening atrocity, militants raised the black flag of IS over an historic citadel, increasing fears of the imminent destruction of 2,000-year-old ruins and priceless artefacts in the World Heritage site.
Yesterday Syrian state television reported that 400 civilians had been killed, many of whom were found decapitated.
State employees seem to have been targeted, including the head of the local nursing department and all her family. Thousands of other residents were trapped in the city as IS militants seized their properties. 
Members of the Syrian army crouch before cameras after they were seized by ISIS during the takeover of Palmyra
Members of the Syrian army crouch before cameras after they were seized by ISIS during the takeover of Palmyra
Islamic State militants overran the famed archaeological site at Palmyra, just hours after seizing the central Syrian town
Islamic State militants overran the famed archaeological site at Palmyra, just hours after seizing the central Syrian town.

Meanwhile in Iraq, security forces fought to regain territory from IS after losing control of Ramadi, a strategically important provincial capital 60 miles west of Baghdad.
Iraq’s government, along with Iran-backed Shi’ite militiamen and locally recruited Sunni tribal fighters, launched a counter-offensive on Saturday. It followed a wave of airstrikes in the region over the weekend which took out IS positions.
Yesterday a police major and a pro-government Sunni tribal fighter in the area said they had retaken the town of Husaiba al-Sharqiya, around six miles east of Ramadi. 

But US Defence Secretary Ashton Carter accused Iraq’s army of abandoning the city to a much smaller enemy force. In a sharp criticism, he told CNN: ‘The Iraqi forces just showed no will to fight. They vastly outnumbered the opposing force, and yet they withdrew from the site.’
But Hakim al-Zamili, head of the Iraqi parliamentary defence and security committee, hit back and called for more support to effectively battle IS.
The US said it was sending anti-tank weapons to the Iraqi military.

EX-ARMY CHIEF: SEND UK TROOPS NOW 

A former head of the Army has urge
d the Government to ready 5,000 troops, spy planes and Apache attack helicopters to fight Islamic State in Iraq.
Lord Dannatt, the former chief of the general staff, called for David Cameron to ‘think the previously unthinkable’ and draw up plans for sending troops for a ‘fight to the finish’.

Writing in the Mail on Sunday, Lord Dannatt said he feared the need for British ‘boots on the ground’ was increasing due to the failure of air strikes to thwart IS and a lack of political solutions. 
Former head of the Army Lord Dannatt has called on the Government to 'think the previously unthinkable' and consider sending ground troops into the battle
Former head of the Army Lord Dannatt has called on the Government to 'think the previously unthinkable' and consider sending ground troops into the battle.

And he warned the IS caliphate could advance into southern Europe, leaving Britain to face ‘a far bigger problem later’. 
But his dramatic call to arms was rejected yesterday by Business Secretary Sajid Javid, who said there was a need for troops on the ground – but not British troops.

Mr Javid told BBC One’s Andrew Marr Show: ‘We need to see what more can be done in terms of providing the help we already are...But the answer to this is not going to be British troops on the ground.
‘This has to be won by the people most affected – it’s the Iraqis, the Syrians and we’ve got to provide them help with our allies as we’re doing.’